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90 Points & A Gold Medal!

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The first accolades for our wines have come in. The Beverage Tasting Institute gave our 2011 Pinot Noir a Gold Medal with 90 points, and our 2012 Pinot Gris a Silver Medal with 89 points. “A rock solid pinot for the table, especially duck.” Check out our Awards page for details.

SIP Northwest Feature

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Our 2012 Pinot Gris was the recent Daily Sip on Sip Northwest Magazine. Editor Erin James selected the wine as her “Daily Sip” adding “the wine itself exudes refreshing aromas of green apple and pear with tart and bittersweet notes, preserved lemon and lime rind are also prevalent and grow in the finish with the crisp acid and pear flavors.”

The Coming Of Age Of Oregon Pinot Noirs

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“..tasting pinot noirs from the Willamette Valley in Oregon was exciting. The wines were delicious, and I was pleased to find so many of them in a lovely, restrained style that invited rather than overpowered.  These, I would like to think, are the sorts of wines that inspired those far-sighted pioneers back in the late 1960s and 1970s who imagined that Willamette would be a great place to grow pinot noir.” – By Eric Asimov, The New York Times

Oregon Pinot Gris Satisfies On All Levels

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“I am more impressed than ever with the style and potential of Oregon Pinot Gris.  Among its strengths are: • Higher acidity and lower alcohol than most domestic versions • Bracing minerality; an underlying sense of wet stone flavors • Purity of fruit • Minimal or no new oak flavors This brief summary nonetheless touches on almost every important trend among both young wine drinkers and restaurant wine buyers. White wines that ripen at lower alcohol levels, that reflect fruit and vineyard flavors rather than new barrel flavors, and that complement a wide variety of regional foods are in vogue. Oregon Pinot gris does all of the above.  In them you will find flavors crisply defined, with fruits running the gamut from citrus through tree fruits and on into tropical. They are acidic without being lean, and that bracing minerality gives the wines texture and life.” – By Paul Gregutt, Seattle Times